• Welcome to the LTOA website

    Welcome to the LTOA website

    The London Tree Officers Association (LTOA) constitutes the professional & technical voice for London's trees & woodlands Read More
  • Become a Sponsor

    Become a Sponsor

    The LTOA relies on subscriptions from its members and sponsorship to operate. Read More
  • CAVAT

    CAVAT

    Capital Asset Value for Amenity Trees (CAVAT). CAVAT provides a method for managing trees as public assets rather than liabilities Read More
  • How to Become a Member

    How to Become a Member

    Members can attend, for free, the the LTOA meetings which are held four times a year and cover a wide range of tree related matters. Read More
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  • Welcome to the LTOA website

    Welcome to the LTOA website

    The London Tree Officers Association (LTOA) constitutes the professional & technical voice for London's trees & woodlands Read More
  • Become a Sponsor

    Become a Sponsor

    The LTOA relies on subscriptions from its members and sponsorship to operate. Read More
  • CAVAT

    CAVAT

    Capital Asset Value for Amenity Trees (CAVAT). CAVAT provides a method for managing trees as public assets rather than liabilities Read More
  • How to Become a Member

    How to Become a Member

    Members can attend, for free, the the LTOA meetings which are held four times a year and cover a wide range of tree related matters. Read More
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  • 2
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The London Tree Officers Association

Welcome to the LTOA website. The London Tree Officers Association (LTOA) constitutes the professional & technical voice for London's trees & woodlands. Its aim is to enhance the management of the Capital's trees.

We hope that you find the LTOA website both interesting & informative. If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Natural Capital Investing in a Green Infrastructure for a Future London

A Green Infrastructure Task Force Report Prepared by the Greater London Authority on behalf of the Green Infrastructure Task Force. This is about a a vision for the Green Infrastructure of the future city. A high quality and well-maintained green infrastructure is integral to keeping the city healthy, happy, moving and functioning.

By 2050, all neighbourhoods will be able to benefit from, enjoy, and take pride in London’s green infrastructure.

To read more click here

The tree pest oriental chestnut gall wasp (Dryocosmus kuriphilus) has been confirmed in sweet chestnut trees (Castanea sativa) in a woodland in Kent.

Statement:

A Forestry Commission spokesperson said:

“The oriental chestnut gall wasp has been discovered in one area of Kent.

“This is a pest that only affects sweet chestnut (Castanea) species of tree, and does not pose any risk to people, pets or farm livestock.

“We have launched an immediate investigation of the surrounding woodland and, once we have fully assessed the situation, we will swiftly take any appropriate action.”

 

Key facts:

  • Oriental chestnut gall wasp is a pest that affects species of sweet chestnut tree. Only European sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) is grown in significant numbers in Britain, and no other tree species in Britain is affected.
  • The Forestry Commission is undertaking a full survey and analysis to determine the scale of the current outbreak and the potential cause of the outbreak.
  • Once we have fully assessed the situation, we will swiftly take any appropriate action.
  • Oriental chestnut gall wasp is a threat to sweet chestnuts in several regions of the world. It reduces nut production and can weaken the tree, leaving it vulnerable to other diseases.
  • The UK has Protected Zone Status against this pest, and the plant health services must be notified of all pending imports of sweet chestnut planting material before its arrival in the UK so that a proportion can be inspected.
  • As part of investigations into the outbreak, the new Observatree group of trained volunteers have agreed to help survey more widely for evidence of the pest.

A full statement has been published on our website at www.forestry.gov.uk/gallwasp, and will be updated as the situation evolves. The affected woodland is Farningham Woods, near Sevenoaks, Kent.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The website should answer most questions you might have, but:

  • forestry media enquiries can be directed to Charlton Clark in the Forestry Commission England press office onThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; tel 0300 067 5049;
  • woodland owners and managers needing further information may contact Forestry Commission England’s tree health team onThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; tel 0300 067 4000.

 The value of London’s trees is proven in ground breaking report

The benefits that all of London’s trees provide have been given a monetary value in the London i-Tree Eco Project report published yesterday. The quantity of these benefits – such as air quality improvement and carbon storage – is the result of the world’s largest survey of a city region involving hundreds of trained volunteers.

Most people appreciate the beauty of London’s trees but may not  know, or tend to take for granted, the benefits that London’s urban forest provides for both people and nature. The i-Tree report, sponsored by Unilever, gives us a much better understanding of the structure and value of London’s urban forest. It is a method that is recognised worldwide and enables comparison with other cities. The information produced enables us to make better plans to manage London’s trees and highlights the need for continued tree planting to increase tree canopy cover over London.

The survey found that:

  • Each year London’s trees remove 2241 tonnes of pollution worth £126m per year. Air pollution is a major issue for London and the contribution made by trees to its reduction has a direct positive impact on public health and is – literally - life saving.
  • Each year London’s trees intercept rainfall and prevent nearly 3½ million cubic metres of water from entering the drainage system and so, reducing the risk of flooding and water pollution events. This is the equivalent of 1365 Olympic swimming pools with a monetary value of £2.8m per year.
  • London’s trees store 2.4 million tonnes of carbon and they sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to reduce the impact of climate change. This is equivalent to the carbon produced from 26 billion vehicle miles.

The report highlights that there are a wide range of tree species - not just native trees but trees from around the world - that are suited to London conditions. However, at a more local level there are vulnerable landscapes that are currently reliant on one or two tree species, such as some parts of central London dominated by the iconic London plane. In order to reduce the risk of large numbers of trees being lost within a short time, planting of a wider species range is needed.

The report calls for everyone to recognise and support the multiple benefits that trees provide for London and to make their own contribution to protecting and enhancing London’s tree cover. This will help ensure that London continues to be a green city for future generations by planting trees in gardens, supporting tree planting by others, supporting organisations that promote and protect London’s trees.

Environment Minister, Rory Stewart, said: “Our trees and forests have long been central to British identity. But we are beginning to understand with even more precision, just how important they are to our air quality, our health and our happiness. This is a fantastic initiative. And it sits very well alongside our drive to plant an additional 11 million trees in this parliament, and to support green spaces across the country.”

Charlotte Carroll, Unilever UK Sustainability and Communications Director, commented: “The findings of this report provide clear evidence of the importance of trees in the fight against climate change and of their value to our society in helping to deliver a more sustainable future. At Unilever we're working on this important issue through our brightFuture movement and with the UN Climate Conference, COP21 in progress, now is the time to engage in the importance of trees in our everyday lives.”

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson said: “London is one of the greenest, leafiest cities on the planet and as this survey proves, our canopy does a ‘tree mendous’ job of lowering pollution, alleviating flood water and boosting our environment.”

Craig Harrison, Forestry Commission London Manager said: “The i-Tree report shows some of the ways in which London’s trees enhance our daily lives, and many of the trees we enjoy today are the legacy of past tree planting. But London’s trees face challenges such as development pressures, climate change and disease. With the expected increase in London’s population the need for more trees will increase - so we need to protect existing trees and plant new trees - to ensure London remains an enjoyable place to live, work and visit”

London iTree survey - The report is available from:

The incident happened over 12 months ago in February 2014. A call came into the Parks department saying a resident was removing Council owned trees. My colleagues at the time attended (as I was on leave) and confronted the house owner; they then called the local park police. The police attended and arrested the house owner. The duty Sergeant then unarrested them. It was only when we pushed the police that they the charged the house owner again.

A few weeks later, I was asked to have a look at the trees again with regard to their value, as some of the trees had been so badly hacked, I made the assumption that they had full canopies prior to the event. The trees have started to regenerate but obviously lost their central leader, so as stated in court, their value was reduced. I was very conservative when calculating their value, this proved to be a good thing in court, as they could see I had not over egged the cake so to speak.

The defence had an expert witness - who concentrated mainly on the condition of a large Ash tree which had been reduced back in 2009. They also brought into the mix poor planning that allowed the property to be built in 2011, far too close to this tree to which I agreed, but was not my issue. There was a Daldinia growing on an old stump on the lower stem but this was irrelevant to the case, as was the Council’s inspection records which were also questioned. It has really highlighted to me the importance of a good and well recorded management system which we now have in place. Prior to this on an open site, such as allotments, we had risk assessments only.

At the beginning of the trial the defence Expert and I got together to produce a joint statement which helped the process and stopped a lot unnecessary hassle during the trial. The Judge was quite good at steering the barristers in getting to the real issue of criminal damage, rather that swaying the jury with misleading information on inspection schedules etc.

The defence was focused on the structural condition of the Ash and that the householder was concerned about the safety of his family - he said there was a hanging branch which he cleared; something that I said would have been dealt with by our term contractor on an emergency basis.  It was obvious that there was far more removed than just a hanging branch. It was also pointed out that the accused used unskilled staff with no safety equipment which put them, him and others at high risk of harm.

In the dock, I was asked about the type of debris and why I believed that more than two branches had been remove from the large Ash. There was also question why we thought all the trees had been damaged at a similar time, freshness of cuts, poor quality, all done in haste etc

In the end it was a unanimous decision by the Jury which was a surprise. The whole thing was quite stressful at times, but a good experience. The lessons I will take away from this are improvements in recorded inspections and more time and detail in producing reports, when investigating criminal damage.

National Tree Officers Conference 2017

Help with drafting a conference abstract for a presentation at the National Tree Officers Conference on 8 November 2017 at Telford, Shropshire is available here. The current call for papers will close with your abstract submitted by 5pm on Friday 12 May 2017.

Sponsored by Barcham Trees

How to Become a Member

Members can attend, for free, the LTOA meetings which are held four times a year and cover a wide range of tree related matters.

Click here to find out how to become an associate member